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    1. Empty Bowls Jail 'N' Bail

      by Angie Osterman | Comments (0)

      Do time for a good cause.

       

      The South Texas Food Bank will be hosting their annual Empty Bowls “Jail & Bail” event on SATURDAY AUGUST 8th from 11 A.M. - 3 P.M.

       

      We hope you will accept our invitation to be a part of this great event. All “Jailbirds” will be locked up at Mall Del Norte for a photo op. Refreshments will be provided and there will be plenty of media coverage. If you feel that you would like to help us but cannot personally attend, we will gladly “arrest” one of your representatives.

      We are asking for your support in helping us sell 25 tickets to Empty Bowls IX concert. Tickets are available for $10, $15, and $25. You can contact your family, friends and colleagues for help!

      You may also pay your “Bail” ahead of time with a donation of $250.00.

      All the proceeds from this event will stay in Laredo to help the over 27,000 families the South Texas Food Bank services monthly. We need your help to make this event a success. Together we can all help end hunger in our community!

      For more information or to sign up, contact Cindy at cliendo@southtexasfoodbank.org or 956-726-3120. Sponsorship opportunities are available.

    2. Alma Boubel new South Texas Food Bank executive director

      by Salo Otero | Comments (0)

      The South Texas Food  Bank  has a new executive director.  She is native Laredoan Alma Boubel. 

      The South Texas Food Bank board, led by president  Anna Benavides Galo,  and   interim director Erasmo Villarreal made the announcement of Boubel’s appointment   effective July 1  at a recent employees  meeting. She becomes the first female executive of the South Texas Food Bank, which opened in 1989.

      A graduate of the University  of Texas (Austin) with an accounting degree, Boubel’s work experience  includes  17 years as  manager  of accounting and controller at Laredo Medical Center.  She also has an MBA degree from Texas A&M International University.  She joined the STFB in December of 2014 as an accountant.

      Boubel  is married to  Laredoan Edward Boubel, employed by the oil and gas industry.   She attended Our Lady of Guadalupe School and Lamar Middle School before garduatiing  from J.W. Nixon High School in 1977. The couple has a daughter, Brittany, a sophomore at St.  Augustine High School.  Her parents are  Laredo business owners Jesus M. Rodriguez and the former, Ninfa Garza Rodriguez, both in their 80s.

      Boubel noted, “I am greatly honored and humbled with this amazing opportunity that has been bestowed  upon me.  So proud to lead such a wonderful organization that changes so many people’s lives in our and surrounding communities.”

      Board president Galo said, “Our mission of feeding the hungry continues under a new dynamic executive director.  She  brings great attributes to lead the South Texas Food Bank into the future.’’

      Interim director and  longtime board member Villarreal added. ”Our new executive director is a strong compassionate leader with a great vision to help alleviate hunger in our area.”

      The South Texas  Food Bank (STFB) opened  in 1989 under the  auspices of H-E-B as the Laredo Webb-County  Food Bank distributing  supplemental food to the unemployed, under-employed  and those living on fixed incomes  especially  the elderly.   The STFB,  member of  Feeding Texas   and the national  organization Feeding  America,  serves an impoverished eight-county area  from  Del Rio (Val Verde County)  to Rio Grande City (Starr County),   helping  an average  of 27,000  families, 7,000 elderly, 7,000 children and 500 veterans and their widows per month.  The food bank serves an after school meal to   an average of 1,500 children  per day  Monday through Friday  in the Kids Café program at  19 sites. The food bank  website is www.southtexasfoodbank.org.  Tax deductible donations can be mailed to South  Texas Food Bank, 1907 Freight, Laredo, Tex., 78041.

    3. Bowling Tourney July 21 benefits South Texas Food Bank

      by Salo Otero | Comments (0)

      A “Strike Out Hunger” bowling tournament fundraiser for the  South Texas Food Bank  mission of feeding the hungry is set for Tuesday July 21 at 5:30  p.m. at Jett Bowl North.  The tourney is open to everyone.  Five-player teams (three games) can sign up for $125 per lane. Sponsorship advertising is open for $250.  For information call Cindy Liendo at 726-3120 or email cliendo@southtexasfoodbank.org.

      The South Texas  Food Bank (STFB) opened  in 1989 under the  auspices of H-E-B as the Laredo Webb-County  Food Bank distributing  supplemental food to the unemployed, under-employed  and those living on fixed incomes  especially  the elderly.  

      The STFB,  member of  Feeding Texas   and the national  organization Feeding America,  serves an impoverished eight-county area  from  Del Rio (Val Verde County)  to Rio Grande City (Starr County),  helping  an average  of 27,000  families, 7,000 elderly, 7,000 children and 500 veterans and their widows per month.  The food bank serves an after school meal to   an average of 1,500 children  per day  Monday through Friday  in the Kids Café program at  19 sites.

      The food bank website is www.southtexasfoodbank.org.  Tax deductible donations can be mailed to South Texas Food Bank, 1907 Freight, Laredo, Tex., 78041.

       

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    4. Panda Express sales Monday to help South Texas Food Bank

      by Salo Otero | Comments (0)

      Panda Express  Chinese Kitchen of Laredo is helping  the South Texas Food Bank mission of feeding the hungry.  On Monday, June 8 the restaurant, located at 2603 North Bob Bullock Loop, will donate a portion of all its proceeds to the South Texas  Food Bank.

      All Panda Express establishments across the nation  are involved via Feeding America.   The  project is called, “Together we’re Feeding America.”   Panda Express founders Andrew and Peggy Chang note,  “With 49 million people in America struggling with hunger the Panda Express family is proud to partner with Feeding America and its nationwide network of local food banks to help solve hunger.”

      The Laredo Panda Express is open from 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m., mostly as a take out kitchen.  Juana Talavera is the manager and Eddie Rodriguez,  the assistant.  Rodriguez, a 2012 graduate of Alexander High School, said,  “Panda Express is super happy  to be a community partner.  Each plate purchased provides 12 meals for people – that’s incredible what the food bank does to help the needy.”  He added that  the business  is doing very well, thanks to Laredo’s response.   He has been with the company since the  store opened three years ago after training in Houston. “The corporation is shooting to raise  up to $10 million for Feeding America,” he said.

      The South Texas Food Bank, located at 1907 Freight in west Laredo, telephone 956.726-3120, website www.southtexasfoodbank.org, serves 27,000 families per month.

    5. Six elementary school boys raise money for South Texas Food Bank adopt a family

      by Salo Otero | Comments (0)

      Six boys from Elsa Rodriguez  Garcia’s  fourth grade gifted and talented class at Col. Santos Benavides Elementary School have made a difference in the lives of seven families struggling with hunger and   on the rolls of the  South Texas Food Bank.

      Sean Villarreal, Brandon Bento-Jackson, Kalin Rodriguez, Alejandro Ventura, Hector Garza and Matthew Morin took the issue of hunger to the front door of the WalMart  on Northeast  Bob Bullock Loop 20 and raised $840 for the South Texas Food Bank Adopt a Family program.  Adopt a Family started more than a decade ago.   A $120 annual  donation means a needy family receives a box of groceries per month.   The program helps 400 families monthly.

      The boys, who  tagged themselves Hunger Fighters and drew up a logo with a fist  and put it on  a  t-shirt,  raised the funds by selling lemonade for $1 per cup from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on May 4-5.    It was part of Ms. Garcia’s lesson plan for three groups  identifying issues in Laredo.  She noted that one group took the cancer issue and another the elderly, visiting them locally.

      The boys checked the South Texas Food Bank website at southtexasfoodbank.org  to view how they could help.  They setup an after-school  tour of the food bank, located at 1907 Freight in west Laredo, and learned  about adopt a family from STFB staffer Leo de la Garza.  “He gave us a tour.  It was great. He had a sense of humor,”  noted one of the boys.

      The six echoed, “It’s a  matter of helping the poor.  The hungry is our community.  We thought it would be awesome.  It’s all about being kind.”

      “I was amazed at what  they did,”  Ms. Garcia lauded.   “We were  so excited that they surpassed their original goal (of  three or four families).’’

      “What  these  boys did is an example  for all young and old,”  South Texas Food Bank board member  Doug Howland  said.   “We’re hoping more get involved in the mission.  Monetary donations are very crucial to our organization and the need continues.”

      The group   used   ingenuity and marketing.  They made and sold the lemonade and then added donuts to the menu.  “The donuts attracted sooo many people,” the boys gleamed.

      And, of course, the best marketing and fundraising  tool of all,  asking for a donation toward a crucial  cause.   The question,  what was the biggest donation you got?  “I got a $20 bill,” said one of the boys.  “I got a 50,” said another. “He asked  for change.”   That’s  $49 in change?  What did you tell him after that?  “I said thank you.”

      Yes ,every dollar counts.

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